Posted by & filed under Marketing, Product development, Social Media, Startups.

Social media is often recommended as THE thing to do for startups. But they usually forget to say why. Non-social media people often see the different social media channels just as places where people share silly things about their lives and random cat videos. And with that, they fail to understand what an amazing tool social media can be. That’s why I’m going to share with you 7 reasons social media is a must for startups.

One of the harsh truths of being a startup entrepreneur is that no matter how cool your idea is, that alone isn’t enough. Some entrepreneurs believe that as long as their solution is good the customers will just somehow appear. But that’s just not how it works (shocking, I know). It is not just once or twice when the much worse solution has taken over the market (take for example the case of VHS). You need to get your startup in the minds of the buyers, how else would they know that your product/service even exists? And as a startup, you have to do that without having the budget of a commercial giant. That is where social media comes in. But it is not only that! The benefits of social media start even much before you have even launched. Read on to find out how.

Just having a cool startup isn’t enough. Customers won’t just magically appear: you need to let them know you even exist! Tweet about it!

1. Reach the right people

For getting your startups into the eyes and hearts of people, social media is one of the best ways. That is because most social media channels have amazing targeting tools. That means you can get the content you want in front of the people that are most likely to be interested in it. That means you are not wasting your time and effort on people who have zero potential of being your customers.

The reason social media targeting so great is that it goes way beyond just age, gender and other basic things like that. Every now and then there are articles about how social media channels know everything about their users. And I mean everything. That is usually told as a gruesome horror story, but for marketers: that means paradise. The more you know about your customers and potential customers, the more precisely you are able to target them. Be it their interests, the languages they speak, where to go on a holiday and so on and so forth. And the best part is: you can do it all for a very low cost!

 

2. Get most bang for your buck

Social media gives you the most bang for your buck. In fact, you might not even have to spend a dime and can still get amazing results! Though usually, you have to put a little bit of money in, especially at the beginning. What is a little bit of money? Often people think that means thousands of euros, but that’s not true. You can get a lot done with couple hundred or even just tens of euros. Sounds too good to be true, huh?

Almost all social media channels make money on ads. But at the same time, ads are exactly what the users don’t want to see. At least if the ads are not relevant to them. Relevant posts and ads, on the other hand, usually bring value to the user. And happy users makes the social media channels happy and they want to encourage the advertisers to keep making their users happy. In short: the better you target your ads, the cheaper it is going to be. So, in the end it’s not about how much money you have, but how you use it. And thus social media levels the playing field with big corporations with endless marketing budgets.

Social media levels marketing for startups – no need for a big corporation’s marketing budget to reach amazing results. Tweet about it!

3. Differentiate and show how cool you really are

The competition is getting more and more heated pretty much no matter what industry you are in. Social media is a great way to differentiate yourself from your competitors. Show who you truly are. What are your values. And why you’re so cool in general. No matter how much we try to think we make our decisions rationally, it is still emotions that play a big role in it. People like to buy from companies that have authentic personalities, companies that just feel good. Social media is an excellent tool to show them exactly that.

Doing social media is also a great way to get positive news about you to the internet, so you don’t have to really on others’ posts (which by the way, might never come). Not only does it help your startup to get know, but when people actually search for you, there is already something good out there.

4. Bypass people’s mental adblockers

Over time we learn to be more and more suspicious about the information we see in ads. ”Of course they would say so, it’s their product. It just can’t be that good in reality”, we think. But in social media, your ads & other posts can look just like the posts your customers’ friends & the people they follow have posted. That again means their mental adblockers are off, and they are much more receptive to your awesomeness.

Another thing is that people go to social media to have fun. They are looking for something to entertain them, something to help them pass a bit of time. And if you do your social media stuff well, that something can easily be the posts (and even ads!) you make. That means your marketing and sales efforts are not seeing as a nuisance, but something they get value from. And that’s a huge difference to traditional advertising!

5. Provide A++ customer service & increase customer loyalty

Social media is a great way to provide A+ customer service. For example, Twitter & Facebook have become THE way to interact and get help quickly from companies (read this post for inspiration). By interacting with your customers and being social you are shedding the image of a faceless corporation and giving them a good feeling about you. And again: it’s all about the feel. When someone has gotten a good feeling about your company through for example talking with you on Facebook, they are much more likely to choose your product over your competitors.

It also pays off long term. Brands that are active on social media will have more loyal customers. Good feeling about you -> they are much more likely to keep buying from you.

Being active on social media – recipe for customer loyalty! Tweet about it!

Here is another kicker: social media can be an amazing help for you way before you even launch your startup!

6. Get people excited about you before you even launch

Most of the startups I have been working with assume they should start doing social media after they have launched their product/service. But that is completely not true! The best possible problem is having people get excited and ready to buy your product/service before its launch. Take for example Dropbox, who had hundreds of thousands of people on the waiting list (read more here), and thus much smoother start when they finally did launch. So, you should definitely start acing your social media game as soon as you can.

Another bonus is that you learn what works and what doesn’t for your startup and its customers. Especially if you are new in using social media for businesses, starting early gives you time to learn before its too late. Also, the same things don’t necessarily work for all businesses, so you should try and test what are the best ways to use the channels for you.

7. Understand your market better & adjust accordingly

When you engage with your potential customers on social media, you start to understand their needs better. You will see if your idea is really worth pursuing or if you should adjust it a bit, pivot, or just scrap it all together. As people talk about their lives and their interests quite freely on social media, you will also get to see a rare glimpse into their lives. And that again helps see how your solution would fit in there. You can do also a lot of great spy work on your competitors! ;)

 

Any important benefits I missed? There definitely are plenty more! Share in the comments or tweet @TiinaHaapanen or @nestholma. In my next post, I will go more in depth about how to actually rule in social media. See you there! :)

 

Posted by & filed under Entrepreneurship, Product development, Startups.

All communities have their jargon, and startups are no different. Probably one of the most used terms is Minimum Viable Product, MVP for short. It’s considered one of the core messages of Eric Ries’ book The Lean Startup. If you hang out with entrepreneurs long enough, you’re likely to hear the acronym used for almost anything that people patch together.

According to Eric Ries, MVP is a “product which has just those features [that solve the core problem] (and no more) that allows you to ship a product that resonates with early adopters; some of whom will pay you money or give you feedback”. It’s necessary to learn quickly whether your idea makes sense to your customers. And if it doesn’t, you want to “fail” quickly, when you haven’t yet invested lots of resources! You build an MVP with the purpose of learning from your customers and understanding your market.

The problem with this is that most people get the meaning of MVP’s completely wrong! And probably the biggest reason is that every single word in that term is misleading. No wonder people misuse it!

Firstly, it might not be a product.

This word is loaded with meaning that does not apply to MVPs. We generally understand products as something that is manufactured or refined for sale. Even if you extend this to a service, the purpose of the MVP is not sales, but rather learning. And MVP is a tool that we use in order to experiment, to find out if the market really behaves like we assume it does. Of course, part of the assumptions we need to validate are whether people would pay for our product, but the mindset is completely different. What you build to validate that people will pay clearly does not include all the things that a final product would.

Using the word “product” makes people think that they have to build something that looks like the final product already, which might not be the case! Later MVPs will indeed be products (or product-looking), but early ones are likely not to be.

Think about the case of Buffer. They built a landing page to test whether people were interested in the product at all, and after that they modified to check whether people would be willing to pay for it. That was before they wrote a single line of code! Most people would not call that a product, but rather an experiment. You can read more about the story here.

Secondly, it’s only viable for the purpose of learning.

This is probably the most criticized word in the MVP term. Andrew Chen proposes to focus on a Minimum Desirable Product instead, to make the “product” more human-oriented. This gets a bit closer to the real purpose of an MVP: to test whether the value proposition is powerful enough to engage your early adopters.

The word viable tends to make people think of whether the business model holds together, and whether the product is technically feasible… which are not the first assumptions that you’re testing! If you’re testing your value proposition, early MVPs might not have a business model behind them. Most of them do not work as a complete business model — for example, if you’re building one side of a two-sided market-place — and are likely not to be viable… except for the purpose of testing your value proposition.

An example of this is Angellist. To test whether people would be interested in a service that connected startups and angel investors, they started by introducing them through email! That would definitely not be a scalable business, but thanks to that they found that there was quite some demand for it. You can read more about their initial launch here.

Finally, it’s not about the minimum set of features, but rather about the core value that it provides.

Don’t get me wrong: MVPs must be minimalistic and beyond. So much that you should be embarrassed about them when you show them around. But because of using the word “minimum”, most entrepreneurs tend to think about the complete product, and then start cutting things off. They often try to boil down their final product — their idea — to the minimum version they’d be happy with.

This is because the purpose of an MVP is to learn as fast as possible. Therefore, the train of thought should not be “what is the minimum set of features” — to which startups add all sorts of stuff — but rather “what’s the quickest way I can find out if this is good business”. As Steve Blank says, a minimum viable product (MVP) is not always a smaller/cheaper version of your final product. It’s something that helps you validate the core.

If the entrepreneur is thinking about several value propositions at once, they will be convinced that the “minimum” set of features is… well, a lot of things. And all of them are important, therefore they’re “minimum”. Instead, it pays off to ask the question of “where does the customer get the core value from”, and then build something that validates only that.

One often mentioned MVP is that of Dropbox. To validate whether people would use their product, they created a video showing the product. They didn’t have a product with any features when they put the video out, but the video went viral and they realised they had a really good case ahead of them! You can read more about their story here.

Even if the words we use to describe MVPs are not accurate, the concept of MVPs is clearly useful. So what would be a better way of calling it? Some have even proposed calling it Minimum Viable Experience. Some others, as we mentioned, favour the term Minimum Desirable Product. However, they only address part of the problems.

We think that we can correct each one of the words. And we think we can even do some word juggling so that you can continue using your acronyms comfortably!

Enter… the MVP: Main Value Proof! It’s the entity (product, service, experience, you name it) that lets you test the core value of your business. It’s not only minimal: it focuses on the main ideas, and only on those, so that you can validate them — or disprove them. It revolves around your value proposition, and not around other technicalities that you business concept might have — unless you’re in a later stage, in which you’re testing the value of those technicalities. You can have different MVPs to test your value proposition — which will be far from products — or the way you plan on delivering it — which will actually look a bit more like minimalistic products. But we’re not calling it product, since that could make you fall into innovator’s bias!

So next time you read the acronym MVP, think about the main value proof instead!

Dr. Daniel Collado-Ruiz, @ErCollao

What did you think about the content? Do you disagree? Are you interested in hearing more about other related stuff? Drop us a line in the comments or on twitter, and let’s chat!

 

Beyond startups hype: how collaborating with startups can improve your organization in three key areas

Posted by & filed under Corporations, Customers, General, Product development, Startups.

If you’ve dealt with both, you know that startups and big companies behave very differently. You can hear all sort of stories, from people moving from a corporate job to a startup, to entrepreneurs trying to deal with their corporate customers, to the same corporations trying to make business with startups.

What’s considered best practice in startups or in corporations is dramatically different… sometimes contradictory! And all those best practices make sense if you understand the context in which each one of them operates. In this post I try to make sense of the biggest differences between the two:

Startups Corporations
Value CUSTOMER
They are normally on a quest to solve some big problem from their customers. Something is good if it increases that impact — and turns it into a good business. They make quick prototypes or MVPs to show it to customers, to decide about changes.
PRODUCTIVITY
To beat competition, they need to focus on productivity. They need to be efficient: get the best impact with the least resources. They work with budgets to understand how the company spends. They might calculate the Return on Investment to decide about changes.
Product Development DIALOGUE
They develop the minimum version of their product —focusing on the core — and show it to customers (a few of them, the early adopters) as soon as it’s possible — sometimes before. Based on customer feedback, they take the next steps.
STUDIES
Investing at the beginning of the product development project makes better products. They normally invest resources in market studies to understand demographics and big market niches. They develop requirements to coordinate big teams.
Decisions TEST
Everything is uncertain around them, the only way to find out and decide is to test. Data in consulted, but intuition and gut feeling play a big role in decision making. Decisions are kept small and validated with customers.
ANALYSIS
In big companies, there is much at stake. In-house experts exist and are consulted for decisions. Many people are involved in the decisions. Effects are measured and tracked, and the decision process is as rational as possible.
Pace FAST
The most precious resource for startups is time. They have limited runway — the time until they run out of resources — and they have to be quick to figure out a good business model. The shorter the iteration the better: they focus on speed rather than fine tuning.
STEADY
Predictability and control are seen as positive. Coordinating is difficult, because of the size of the company. Changes might impact many people, who might have their own agendas. It’s important to limit the uncertainty in decisions and changes, and because of that, they take a long time.
Way of working GET-IT-DONE
Startups have small teams that are not very hierarchical. People tend to be a jack-of-all-trades with some specialisation. Everybody learns a bit about everything since there are no in-house experts. The way of doing things is mostly defined ad-hoc.
PROCESSES
People and departments have clear roles and responsibilities. Most of the activities have clear processes that have been optimised. This creates clarity and uniformity in the quality, but can also create bureaucracy. Everyday tasks work well and are predictable.
Communication TRANSPARENT
Communication is mostly clear, short and simple — both inside and towards the outside. New ideas are shared with the outside as much and as quickly as possible, to get feedback. Communication to customers is focused and bold, to validate assumptions.
CAREFUL
Communication is very carefully planned. Towards the outside, there is often a specialised department supervising it. Product information is normally kept secret, to keep competitors away. Internal communication is written with generalist terms so that it applies to all stakeholders, and sometimes has an internal political agenda.
Mistakes FAIL FAST
“Fail fast” has become almost a mantra among entrepreneurs. They normally pivot their business model several times, so it’s good to test assumptions, and to have them fail as soon as possible. They take risks and learn from the experience. This makes them more likely to succeed at radical innovation.
AVOID
There is so much at stake for them, that they can’t allow themselves to fail. Plans are made to minimise the chances of any mistake hitting the market. Employees have areas of expertise, in which they’re expected to have the right answers. Risk are detected and managed. This makes them good at incremental innovation, but generally not at radical innovation.

Of course, this doesn’t apply to all startups or to all corporations. Each company is different! But in our experience organizing corporate accelerator programs with Nestholma, we have seen a lot of them behave like this.

What’s your experience? Leave us a comment below!

 

What is the best way to collaborate with startups for your organization? [FREE whitepaper]

Posted by & filed under Customers, Funding, Product development, Startups.

4 out of 10 first-time entrepreneurs fail because they forget one of the basics: following their revenues and expenditure – cash flow. In established companies balance sheets and income statements are king, but for startups, it is all about following the numbers in their account: money coming in and out. It sounds very simple (and it is!), but still, I have seen way too many startups to fail because of it.

Here are the 3 common reasons this happens:

 

  1. Not checking your revenues & expenditure often enough

Looking at your finances is a tedious task. It’s quite boring, and you already have so many other important things to do. And let’s be honest: only a few of us are excited to look at the row of minus’, which is usually the case at the beginning of the startup journey. Thus we often decide to do it “tomorrow”. And more often than not, the startups notice the warning sign too late.

  1. Being too optimistic

You need to have a bit of crazy optimism when you are an entrepreneur, but not when you are estimating things like your expenses, funding needs and time x, y and z will take. Startups tend to make their estimates only a small portion of what they really are, which makes them very ill-prepared.

But why that happens? It is partly being overly optimistic & part not understanding how startups work. Things rarely work out how and when you want them to, and there are many variables you just can’t predict. The market, competition, and even the customers’ needs will change. As time goes by, you will also start to understand your customers better. All this means you will have to make adjustments to achieve better product-market fit. Startups usually pivot, i.e. change from plan A to plan B (or even to plan Z!) 3-5 times at the beginning. All this take time and money and push the time of your first sale forward. But expenses still start from day one.

That is why it is important to constantly check your cash flow and be realistic about the ‘whens’ and ‘how muchs’. When you do that, you know when you are going to be out of money and still have time to do something about it. It takes 3-6 months to get funding, investments, etc. so I can’t stress enough how important it is to knowing when you are out of money early enough. Too many startups come up to me less than a week before they were out of money and still believed they would magically make it. You can guess what really happened.

  1. Not understanding when the money is actually coming to your account

For some reason, many startups believe that when they sign a deal, their money-related problems will fly out of the window. But that is not how it works. It might take weeks, months if not even years before the money is actually in your account! It all depends on what you agreed. Also, not everyone pays their bills in time. Trust me, it happens more often that you’d think. There also might be other problems delaying payments like dealing with reclamations. But again: your expenses won’t wait. So remember: even though money is coming in, sooner or later, you might be out of money and bankrupt well before that! Ask yourself: when exactly we will get the money, and will we survive till then.

In my next post, I will give you more concrete tips on how to get your time frames and expense estimates close to reality.

 

Related post: 7 tips on how to ace your startup finances – cash-flow management

 

Posted by & filed under Customer development, Customers, General, Product development, Startups.

Your startup can only succeed if it can provide real value for your customers. Stop guessing what are your customers’ problems or needs and what they consider valuable. Here’s a framework to help you to really listen to your customer and learn what are the problems your product should solve.

Steve Jobs famously said, “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” It’s true that

your customers usually don’t know what is the solution or product they need, but they can tell you what is their problem. Tweet this

Let your customer tell you what is the problem. Don't guess.Take a look at the person missing the bus in the image. What is the product or solution he needs? An alarm clock, timetable app, marriage counseling or what? We can guess, but he can probably tell us in detail what are the problems that make him miss his bus. In other words, just talk with your customer. Once you understand the problems and needs, then it’s your job to be the visionary entrepreneur that comes up with the ingenious solution that the customer could have never envisioned.

If you make sure that you are developing products that someone actually needs, you will eliminate one the biggest reason for which startups fail. But every time we tell our startups to – as Steve Blank says – get out of the building and talk with the customers, they say that it’s hard to do. Based on our experience on working with hundreds of entrepreneurs, we’ve come up with a framework for the customer interviews. Use these five areas as your checklist for discussion topics when you are validating the customers’ problems:

  1. Needs and problems that your customers have
  2. Context for the problems
  3. Substitutes for solving the problems
  4. Value of the problems (time, money etc.)
  5. Other people that have the same problem

What is the most important question to ask from a customer?

My life's work remembered by my Mom (copyright Topi Jarvinen)As Rob Fitzpatrick said in his excellent book “The Mom Test” never ask for opinions from your customers. Ask for specific things that they know about – how they are currently doing things or have done in the past. These are things they know about, and most people like to talk about themselves.

Never try to sell your idea to your potential customers and get them to agree with you when you’re still learning about the problem. It’s really hard to get any reliable information this way, because they probably just don’t want to hurt your feelings. Just like talking to your Mom, right?

When talking with the customers, always let them to do the talking. Your job is to listen and learn. Never ask yes or no questions. Instead ask open questions that let them to describe the problems in their own words and tell you things you’ve never thought of.

The perfect question in most situations is

“Interesting, can you tell me more about it?” Tweet this

Here are some more examples of the kinds of questions we’ve found to be effective customer interviews.

Ask the customer to tell you what are their problems

A large part of business is focused on solving problems—real problems for real people. Grasp the real nature of the problem, and it can be simple to solve. You can do so by asking a few simple questions:

  • What are the difficulties you are experiencing?
  • What is the problem with [x]?
  • How often do you have this problem?

When you start talking with people, you have to teach yourself to hear the important message in their problem statements.   Try to understand:

  • What problems does the customer want us to solve?
  • What is the customer behavior or preferences today?

Remember that it’s not always the most visible and biggest problem that you must solve for your customer. In fact, all the seemingly smaller problems can lead you to areas that specific enough for you to solve. Listen to your customers carefully.

Understand the context in which problems occur

To do this you need to see customer feedback that spans beyond the basic.  You need to understand the context in which the problems occur. Questions such as these can help grow your product and your relationship with your customers.

  • Are there certain things that happen before or after the problem occurs?
  • Does the problem happen often or does it take a long time?

These should help you to understand if there are specific circumstances when the problem occurs. Also, your potential customers may have some real or self-inflicted limitations: common examples are be laws or industry regulations, language, personal preferences etc.

Try to understand how people are solving the problems today

The simplest way to place yourself ahead of the competition is by understanding customers’ needs and problems as well as by understanding what is your competition.  And your competition is not always another company. You may be also looking to improve upon an existing habit, custom or use of a product.

For example, an Indian entrepreneur just invented “edible spoons”. They work perfectly fine as spoons, and you can eat them with the food. The problem with conventional spoons was that they were a big hassle when it came to packing. He needed a substitute solution.

If there’s a real problem, people probably are doing something or using something to solve the problem already. Try to understand this by asking:

  • How do you solve this problem?
  • Is there current way good enough?
  • Do you wish there was something else available?

Then used this feedback to start to think about:

  • Who are the real competitors?
  • What are the current products not doing right?

Determine the value of your product based on their current and past actions and experiences

Nine out of ten startups fail. Most of these failures are not because of insufficient capital or poor marketing, but because they were selling something that nobody wanted to buy.

According to Fortune, most startups fail because “they make products no one wants”.  The solution to this is to focus on what your customers consider valuable. After all,

customer will pay for the value you provide, not for your vision. Tweet this

Asking your potential customer “how much would you pay for this” is not a good way to determine the value. How would they know? You’re asking them to predict the future. Instead ask about things they know about:

  • How much do you currently spend on a product for this type of need?
  • Is it a big problem for you?
  • How much time or money you waste because of this problem?

Remember, not every problem is worth solving with a new product. Sometimes the time savings, cost efficiency, new revenue opportunity, enjoyment or some other benefit of the new solution just doesn’t provide enough value to make your new product interesting. You need to understand this before you waste your time and money on a product no-one wants.

Ultimately, you need to reflect on the answers to your potential customers’ questions by asking yourself:

  • How do my customers spend money in these types of situations?
  • How do my customers spend money for similar needs?
  • What do my customers see as valuable?
  • Is it a real problem or just a small annoyance?

Meet other people—never assume everyone has the same problem

Make sure your startup is offering solution for a problem faced by a sufficiently large number of people. Simply ask your prospective customers, “Does someone else have this same problem?  Would you please introduce me to her?”

Never start building something if it doesn’t have a big enough market. And you have to figure out what is big enough for you. Usually, the best bet is to aim to dominate a niche market and grow from there, as Silicon Valley VC Peter Thiel said in his excellent book Zero to One. Just make sure that there is a market where you can provide enough value.

Make talking with customers your everyday habit

Tweet this
The bottom line is very simple.  Talking with customers before developing new products will help you to build something that actually provides value that they are willing to pay for.  When you understand what is the problem that needs to be solved, you’re well on your way to becoming a successful startup.

And don’t stop there! You need to talk to your customers all the time – even when you’re running a billion-dollar business. As entrepreneur and VC Mark Cuban said:

It is so much easier to be nice, to be respectful, to put yourself in your customers’ shoes and try to understand how you might help them before they ask for help, than it is to try to mend a broken customer relationship

Topi Järvinen @topij

 

Posted by & filed under General, Press release, Product development, Startups, Technology.

Nestholma joins EIT ICT Labs Trusted Cloud High Impact Initiative to help the SME’s to make a bigger business impact and to support the ecosystem collaboration.

Trusted Cloud HII Acceleration Days in Munich

British Telecom, Telecom Italia, 3D Repo and U-Hopper working together.

EIT ICT Labs Trusted Cloud High Impact Initiative (HII) Acceleration Days gathered six SME’s and three large corporations together in Munich to strengthen the collaboration in building secure European cloud solutions. The event was arranged by Nestholma Venture Accelerator from Finland and Digital Catapult from UK. The aim was to get the small and large companies (British Telecom, Telecom Italia, F-Secure) across Europe to learn from each other and accelerate building the partnerships and customer-driven businesses.

The foundation of the Trusted Cloud Acceleration Days was based on Nestholma’s accelerator model which is based on the idea of helping startups or SME’s and large corporation to efficiently work and build businesses together.

“Privacy and trust are fundamental issues for every business and affect the lives of every consumer daily. We are excited to be able work with the EIT ICT Labs and the companies across Europe to speed-up the development of European Trusted Cloud services with Nestholma’s unique accelerator model” say Nestholma’s CEO Topi Järvinen.

The program included tens of structured one-on-one meetings, Trusted Cloud technology sessions as well as insights and help on building customer-driven secure cloud solutions. Both the SME’s and large corporations felt the Acceleration Days gave them a good foundation for collaboration in the Trusted Cloud High Impact Initiative. Geoff Andersson from one of the SME’s, PixelPin says that

“As a company committed to users privacy and protecting personal data it was great to get so much support from the Acceleration Days in Munich. Operating in the cloud brings many business benefits and getting it right is a must, so we see working with EIT ICT Labs as a vital step forward for us.”

The activity leader, Markku Kutvonen from F-Secure was also pleased with the results.

“The event was short and intensive engagement journey for the SMEs joining the activity, with a lot of business focus delivered by Nestholma and Digital Catapult. I especially liked the matchmaking, where all the partners in our activity shared their contribution and results with the other partners in short one to one sessions. This both created a great atmosphere and awareness of each other’s role and induced innovation inside the group. Very co-operative and successful event, overall.”

Tursted Cloud Munich Acceleration Days

 

More information about the EIT ICT Labs Trusted Cloud High Impact Initiative (HII)