Posted by & filed under Corporate Venture Capital, Featured, General, Investing.

The startup event of the year, Slush, was last week and that meant it was also time for our official Slush side event: Corporate Venture Capital.

Together with Helsinki Business Hub, Mawsonia and Global Corporate Venturing we got together the brightest of the CVCs from all over the world. And thanks to the great speakers and our amazing attendees we got an interesting peek into what’s in the minds of the CVC professionals all over the world.

Corporate Venture Capital is here to stay

Corporate venture capital has been on the rise. But lately, some have started questioning whether it’s just a boom that is going to die soon.  Read more »

Posted by & filed under Corporations, General, innovating, Investing, Organizational learning, Product development, Startups.

 

Corporate venture capital has been an excellent way for many companies to increase shareholder value. Research shows 30% better increase of share value with companies with strong Corporate Venture capital activities.  And if you look for example at the biggest Chinese giants, most of that valuation increase is because of good investments, not operative business.

But it’s usually done only with later-stage companies.
Read more »

Posted by & filed under Fintech, Interview, Investing, Startups.

”Many startups think they will change the world. But that can make them sidetracked and fail. They should focus on their core instead.”

Johan Lundberg is the founding partner and CEO of the Swedish venture capital firm NFT Ventures – the largest and most active fintech investor in Europe. I got the chance to talk with him a bit about fintech and if he was able to give one advice to fintech startups, what would that be.

Going global is overrated

According to Johan, one of the biggest misconceptions among startups is that you need to go global as soon as possible, especially in the smaller countries like in the Nordics. The local market just isn’t seen big enough to succeed. There is also great external push to becoming a global player; just take a look at the news and you will see how important exporting and supporting companies’ globalization activities are. But according to Johan, that is not the case with fintech.

”In fintech there really aren’t any banking services that have gone global. Regulations, banking systems etc. – all of those are different in different countries. And that makes fintech very domestically oriented industry. Going global is difficult. And at the same time, there is no need. Even a relatively small country like Finland is big enough for fintech companies. Just take for example a look at the volume of all kinds of banking related transactions – there is enough volume,” he says.

Stop trying to change the world – or at least make sure your core is gold first

More than focusing on globalization, Johan hopes startups would focus more on their core business.

”Many startups think they will change the world. It is great and all, but they get easily distracted because of that. The most important thing to remember is to focus on the core business. Getting sidetracked can easily make you forget what really matters and be the end of your business.”

It is common for startups to aim to be “The Next Big Thing”. To get there many startups focus on growing as fast as possible. But as a result, they end up doing many things okay. To be the next big thing your core needs to be amazing, not okay. Okay just isn’t enough.

As for the future, Johan believes fintech is going to go through even more big transformation. But he doesn’t see that there would be as radical innovations like the blockchain coming any time soon. He believes that the building blocks of that transformation are already there. For him fintech is a hot industry and is only getting hotter.

“There will be more money in the financial sector than now in the future but very differently distributed. Changes are coming and that is exactly why fintech is so interesting.”
 

Related post: What’s hot in fintech: new regulations, customer focus, collaboration & China

 

Posted by & filed under Accelerator, Entrepreneurship, Funding, Investing, workshop.

Pitching to investors to get funding can be scary. Typical professional investor listens to hundreds of pitches every year, and this makes them busy and impatient. If you don’t make it easy for them to understand why you are the next big thing, they’ll throw you out. You have to earn every second with the investor. Here’s the simple pitch deck structure that the Nestholma startups have been using successfully when pitching to investors for funding.

When you get a meeting with an investor for 20 minutes, don’t expect it to last for 20 minutes. It’ll last as long as the investor thinks you’re interesting. If you have five minutes to pitch on stage, don’t expect the investors to listen for the entire time. If you’re not making sense, they’ll start looking at their phones while waiting for the next pitch. Investors value their time – make sure you value it, as well.

You need to deliver the punchline right in the beginning: what is your big idea, what is the real problem you’re solving and how you do it. Tweet this!

If these seem interesting, only then the investors want to listen to the details and consider funding you. Start with these three first:

1. The elevator pitch needs to say the essentials in 10 seconds

Bankiton pitching for funding at Nestholma Demo DayIn the first 10 seconds you need to convince the listener that you have something interesting to say. Saying your value proposition is a great starting line. Personally, I’m fond of Steve Blank’s value proposition formula “We help X do Y by doing Z”. You need to get the investor excited and curious to hear more why you should get funding from them. The investor may only listen to this!

2. Problem worth solving and funding

What is the problem that needs to be solved (not all problems are like that)? How have you validated that the problem really exists? Don’t over-do this, but make sure that the investor can understand what you are solving and why. If you want to tell a short personal story, this is the place to do it – not in the beginning.

3. Solution that customers are willing to pay for

How can you solve the validated problem in a way that customers are willing to pay for? Be as concrete and specific as possible. Screenshots, workflows or even a short video are great. Stay away from meaningless jargon, such as “Our solution provides unprecedented ease of use and scalability”.

Now you’ve covered the most important things. If you’re still in the room, you can go into details in your pitch to get funding from investors.

4. Real and addressable market and customers

Your opinion about the market doesn’t matter. Numbers are great but explain clearly what is the significance to your business. “We are working in a $3 billion market” may sound nice, but it is meaningless fluff. Show your traction or explain the logic for getting the customers (deals in place, access to customers or distribution channels etc.). Testimonials are always good. When you have a paying or just a potential customer (at early stages) say nice things about you, it’s always powerful.

5. Revenue model for monetizing the value you provide

If you solve a real problem, the customer will want to pay for it. It can be with money, their data, time or, for example, with services that they provide in turn. Give a clear outline of how your company makes money with the idea. What value are your customers paying for, how much and often and who are your partners etc? Focus on the logic. The details – such as $4.99 or $9.99 a month – may change.

Especially at early stages, it’s more important to convince the investors that the logic behind the revenue model makes sense. Tweet this!

6. Your unfair advantage that keeps others away from your market

Do you have something that competitors don’t have or cannot get easily? Be critical about this! It has to be something unique, or don’t say anything. It can be existing deals, IPR or, for example, unique experience. It’s not “great and committed team”. Not everyone has an unfair advantage in the beginning (just think about Google or Facebook in the early days). For an investor, it’s an added benefit but not a showstopper if you don’t have it.

7. Marketing and getting customers

How do you reach your customers? This not a list of the obvious channels (blog, some, Adwords, PR etc.), but your recipe for success. Everyone uses social media channels, but how will you make them work for you? Explain in your pitch what are the most important channels to reach your specific customer base. What is the cost or, for example, conversion rate you’ve validated? Does your product have a growth engine or can you use some clever growth hacking tactic to boost your growth?

8. Why are you better aka positioning

The thing about what makes you unique and why your customers are paying for your product. Make a 2X2 matrix the two most important things in your product as the x- and y-axes. Place your company and the competitors on the matrix. The aim is to give an easy way to see how you compare with others at a glance. You can provide the feature-by-feature comparisons to investors as background materials if requested.

9. Running the business with the numbers

Provide an overview of the business with a simple cash-low estimate. Don’t just make Excel fantasies. Justify the numbers with deals, traction, benchmarks, sales funnel, customer development etc. Your business logic is more important than the plain numbers. Remember that these may end up in the actual funding decision, so don’t treat them lightly.

Don’t show Excel fantasies to investors! You need to justify the numbers with data. Tweet this!

10. The team worth funding

Explain why you have the perfect mix of people and way of working. Why can make a big business out of the idea? Show the core team, but also mention interesting advisors, investors or board members. Unless you have 100 people and a real organization, don’t use titles like SVP of Product. That may sound nice to your mother, but for an investor, it sounds funny. Most investors will tell you that the team is one of the – if not the – most important thing in funding decisions. Therefore sometimes startups start with their team slide. I’d advise against this unless the investors know the team members. Another “greatest full-stack developer in the world” is interesting only if you have a good idea. But if you have Mark Zuckerberg in your team, put that on the cover slide.

11. Roadmap and how you’ll use the funding

Present a timeline that shows what you are going to do and how much money you need for each step. Explain how you are planning to use the investors’ money. Pay also attention also to working capital needs if your solution has, for example, hardware unit costs. Make sure that the roadmap and spending is aligned with your overall message. It sounds strange if you claim to have the best developer team, and now you say that you need to hire more developers. You may need them, but you need to have justified the new hires with, for example, the market opportunity.

12. Make the last words count

We remember the first and last things. Don’t waste time and space on Thank you’s or contact details. They’ll find them if needed. Instead, end with your value proposition. It reminds the investor why you are interesting, what value you provide. And why they should join the ride.

Collectly pitching at Nestholma event

 

Every investor has their own preferences for the pitch content. Depending on your company stage, you will be expected to deliver different types of things. Also, take into account who are the persons in your audience. What interests them, do they like technical details, numbers or something else? Before every investor meeting, make sure you find out what is the expectation. Talk to their portfolio companies, read their blog posts and tweets or just ask the investors.

This blog post is based on one of the more than 20 workshops run during Nestholma’s accelerator program.Check out also how our startups pitch to investors at our Demo Day.

Topi Järvinen @topij

 

Posted by & filed under Accelerator, Investing.

…or equally bad. When the head of Y-combinator had invested into 720 startups, he said that he can’t predict which of his investments will be successful. We can’t either. Because these are already the best ones and they all should succeed.

Out of 100 startups I have invested in, 3 are bankrupted and some are receiving XX millions of funding. And I was not able to predict that. The fact is that none of us can predict all of the investments right. So now I am trying to learn from our team’s decision making. I am also making a prediction. Let’s see if I’ll be right with it.

But seriously, we have not yet done single unicorns so Y-combinator is clearly ahead of us. But we try harder =).

We invested in all startups on Nordea Fintech Accelerator and today’s pick is Collectly.co

Their promise: increase effect 3-4 fold and do it 90% cheaper. Not a bad promise for a debt collection company. To do that they use AI and profile the debtor. They do profiling by using many sources and automating it all. Then they approach the debtor with the message and channel most effective for this kind of profile. All this automated. The system also keeps on learning to increase the efficiency. Simple stuff and strong value add.

 

They had relevant experience from the field. They had the tech skills as well as an ability to make people listen. They worked well together. I did not find any red flags. But one. I was wondering will they have the attitude “I’ve been there and done that, don’t tell me what to do”. Because the best teams are strong and skilled, yet able to listen and learn. Almost an impossible combination =). But that fear did not materialize. The opposite happened. They were cooperative and also brilliant in using us. And they still do. They make me talk with investors to share our experiences. And because they deliver, it’s easy to talk about them.

The best teams are strong and skilled, yet able to listen and learn.Tweet about it!

So how do we at Nestholma make investment decisions?

We look for great teams with simple, understandable big value add. So, one should always remember to ask the following questions from himself: are the benefits to customers big enough and will they understand it easily? Can the team deliver it? It’s as simple as that.

Ask: are the benefits to customers big enough and will they understand it easily? Can the team deliver it? Tweet about it! 

And my prediction: we’ll hear from the guys at Collectly. A lot.

Click here for Collectly’s pitch.